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Fitness & Health at School Archive

Keeping schools germ free, getting kids in shape, encouraging healthier choices for the whole family—the Healthy School Kids article archive has inspiration, ideas, and tips to make your PTO and school community the healthiest it can be! Find more tools and info on the Fitness & Health at School resources page.

  • Date Book: Red Ribbon Week

    Red Ribbon Week, the drug abuse awareness campaign sponsored by National Family Partnership, takes place Oct. 23-31. At many schools, parent groups organize events to raise awareness of the dangers of drugs while encouraging students to stay drug-free. Here are some of the ways PTOs have engaged students.
  • Preventing Cold and Flu: What PTOs Can Do

    Help your school community prepare for cold and flu season with these practical tips.
  • Encourage Healthy Habits at School

    Schools can be breeding grounds for the germs that cause colds, the flu, and other illnesses. Here’s how PTOs can help fight germs to keep kids in class.
  • How PTOs Can Get Students Moving

    Children who exercise enough are more likely to succeed in school, and more school parent groups are helping get them up and off the couch.
  • Family Fitness Night Tips and Ideas

    A family gym night is an inexpensive way for school PTOs and PTAs to get kids moving and put a positive emphasis on physical activity.
  • Healthy Snack Ideas for PTO Events

    Not sure what to offer as health-minded refreshments at your next parent group activity? Give some of these nutritious (and delicious) foods a try.
  • Field Day Activities—Ideas by Age

    Field day activities should reinforce the message that exercise is fun. We’ve gathered ideas for traditional and not-so-traditional activities that will appeal to a wide range of children.
  • Stepping Up to Family Fitness Challenge

    A PTA encourages its school families to walk a combined 1 million steps to better health.
  • 13 Ideas To Get Kids Active

    It’s not exercise when it’s fun. These ideas add a little fitness to your events or serve as great activities on their own.
  • Make Your School More Healthy

    Healthy kids who are active and eat right do better in school. Here’s how your parent group can help.
  • 10 Ways To Promote Healthy Eating

    From field trips to after-school activities, PTOs are helping kids learn about food and health.
  • Food Sales OK Under New S.C. Bill

    A bill to restrict junk food in South Carolina schools, including food sold by clubs and parent groups, has been revised to allow groups to continue to sell items like candy bars and cookie dough through fundraisers.
  • Healthy School Kids

    Wanted to call your attention to PTO Today's newest program, Healthy School Kids. You can find a link to the Healthy School Kids (HSK) sign-up page on ptotoday.com in the main navigation bar, under Helpful Tools.
  • Have a Healthier Bake Sale

    Giving your bake sale a healthy edge doesn’t have to mean less fun, fewer customers, or lower profits. Make choosing a more nutritious treat a fun and interesting alternative to the usual high-calorie fare, and your enthusiasm will win over even skeptical parents and kids.
  • The Buzz: Shape Up

    In addition to supporting their school’s physical education program, many parent groups are finding new ways to foster fitness outside of school hours.
  • Family Night Splash

    A flooded gymnasium almost sinks the silent auction.
  • PTO Wins With Tournament

    Teams of students compete in a basketball tournament that has become a rallying point for the entire middle school.
  • Organizing a School Fun Run

    Done right, a jogathon can build school spirit while also earning some big bucks.
  • Fundraiser Goes Into the Woods

    An annual trail race through the town forest uses local resources to raise money while abiding by a policy that prohibits sales by students.
  • A Balanced View of Food Sales

    Federal legislation required school districts to establish “wellness policies” by 2006 that would provide minimum nutritional guidelines for foods available to students. Because each school district could determine what restrictions to impose, however, those standards have varied widely.
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