After the holidays, many schools start anticipating finishing the first 100 days of school. The actual date varies, with most schools reaching the 100th day at the end of January or sometime in early or mid-February.

We’ve compiled a list of fun activities to ring in reaching 100 days of school. You can do them in class or as part of a family event. In addition to being a milestone to mark as a group, a 100th day celebration can help break up the winter with activities, math games, and even literacy and art projects.

100th Day of School Flyer

Say It With a Shirt

A popular idea for marking 100 days of school is to have kids wear shirts with 100 of something on them, like safety pins, buttons, or fuzzy balls. Encourage kids and families to get creative; check out these 11 fun ways to decorate a shirt. (Short on time? Have the children use fabric pens to write up a bunch of equations that add up to the number 100: 1 + 99, 37 + 63, 22 + 78, and so on.)

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Have a Party

Hold a party for students to celebrate completing 100 days of school. Choose some of the ideas and activities from this list, and give the classroom a party feel with some simple decorations—or even by decorating with those activities (for example, tacking up 100 items-in-baggies on a bulletin board or the 100 snowflakes or valentines, taping the kids’ self-portraits to a wall, etc.

You’ll have a guaranteed party hit by setting up a simple photo booth (even just a sheet tacked to a wall) and taking photos (or letting the kids take selfies) with our photo booth prop templates: “100” glasses, “I am 100 days smarter” crown, and more.

100 Days of School Photo Booth Prop Templates

100 Days of School Photo Booth Prop Templates

Make It With Words

There are many ways to mark the day with words. See how many words kids can make with the letters in “one hundred.” Ask kids to come up with 100 positive adjectives that describe their school. Or make it a team effort by giving groups of students kits with 100 words (cut out on paper) and challenging them to create a story.

Fill Small Bags

Send each child home with a small plastic bag to be filled with 100 small items, like buttons, candy, paper cutouts, and more. Encourage kids to think outside the box in choosing their items. In the classroom, add a learning component by having kids guess which baggies would be the heaviest and lightest, then weighing the bags.


via Growing Kinders

Build With 100 Legos

Before the 100th day, ask families to donate or loan Legos, and have kids count out sets of 100. Then see what they come up with. You can extend the activity by seeing what they can build together combining their individual structures.

Take It to the Gym

With your PE instructor’s supervision, challenge kids to do the 100-yard dash, 100 sit-ups, and 100 jumping jacks. End the activities with a beanbag toss to see who can get to 100 tosses first, and award kids who finish a certificate of completion.

PE Challenge Certificate

Certificate for 100th Day PE Challenge

Create a Lasting Memory

Ask students to write 100 reasons why they like their school (or town). (You could divide by the number of students to get as close to 100 reasons as possible—if the class has around 20 students, have each child list five reasons.) Then post and display their reasons on a bulletin board.

Our 100 Reasons Sheet

"100 Reasons" Sheet

Make 100 Decorations

Depending on the timing of your school’s 100th Day, provide materials for students to make 100 snowflakes to decorate the classroom, or 100 hearts if your day falls in February.

Snowflake Templates

Snowflake Templates

Read 100 Books

Leading up to 100th Day, challenge classes to read 100 books. Keep a chart or poster in the class and encourage kids to cheer each other on as they log finished books. If they meet that goal by 100th Day, award them a small prize like a week of longer recesses or special bookmarks, and give them a certificate of completion.

Certificate for Reading 100 Books

Take 100 Steps

To create a sense of collaboration, and a cute way to “decorate,” have children trace their shoe on a piece of construction paper. Then have them cut out the shape, write their name on it, and place a piece of tape on the back. Have each class go out in the school hallway and count 100 steps. When each child gets to 100, they can stick their paper foot on the wall.

Cut 100 Shapes

Provide supplies (glue, construction paper, foam) and have kids cut out shapes—both conventional and from their imaginations—until they have 100 different ones. Glue the shapes to a poster board, and hang it in the classroom or hallway.

If They Were 100…

Have kids do self-portraits of how they imagine they would look at age 100, and ask them to describe in words what they would be like at that age. The results are guaranteed to be amusing (and touching).


via Growing Kinders