PTO Today Q&A

Question: How To Re-Establish a PTO Group?

My child attends a special education school (ages 3-21). I decided to get involved in the PTG only to discover that it went inactive at the end of last year due to lack of interest. I want to re-activate the group, even if it's just getting reestablished and sending quarterly newsletters home. The problems stacked against me are plentiful though: (a) I can't seem to get a hold of anyone at the school to assist me (b) I don't know anyone at the school yet (c) I have no clue what I am doing


Asked by kitkat_137

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Answers:

Advice from PTO Today

Rose H writes:
HI kitkat 137,

Quick question: Does your school run through the summer? Or is there a summer break?

Rose


Advice from PTO Today

Craig writes:
That's great that you're willing to step forward and do this! If possible, I'd suggest seeking out anyone who was involved in the PTG before it went inactive. They can give you a little information on the history and the challenges. Also, talk to the principal to communicate your willingness to help. The principal might be able to give you some recruiting help along with some small goals that might motivate others to help out.

Here's an article that might also help: Get Your PTO Up and Running. Good luck, and please let us know how it goes!


Community Advice

kitkat_137 writes:
Thanks. So I have met with the principal and we are having a parent interest meeting soon to try to get re-established. I know there is an account, but no bylaws and currently the Parent-Teacher Group (PTG) is run by school staff because nobody else is doing so.
I will be helping the principal preside over this meeting but I am not sure what answers we need to have now (last opportunity before next school year). For all I know, nobody will attend :(
Any advice?


Advice from PTO Today

Craig writes:
I don't think you need answers now. I would suggest using this meeting to recruit people to help you plan -- without needing them to commit to being officers or taking any extended role. If even three of you can put your heads together about ways to recruit volunteers, things you want to accomplish, etc., you'll have a leg up on next year. Chances are the people who help plan over the summer will want to get involved in the fall. And at the beginning of the school year people will be more refreshed and excited, and more likely to want to participate.


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